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(Reference retrieved automatically from Web of Science through information on FAPESP grant and its corresponding number as mentioned in the publication by the authors.)

Sex Differences in Alzheimer's Disease: Where Do We Stand?

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Author(s):
Medeiros, Andre de Macedo [1, 2] ; Silva, Regina Helena [1]
Total Authors: 2
Affiliation:
[1] Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista Med, Dept Pharmacol, Behav Neurosci Lab, Sao Paulo - Brazil
[2] Univ Fed Rural Semi Arido, Ctr Hlth & Biol Sci, Mossoro - Brazil
Total Affiliations: 2
Document type: Review article
Source: JOURNAL OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE; v. 67, n. 1, p. 35-60, 2019.
Web of Science Citations: 0
Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that drastically compromises patients' and relatives' quality of life, besides being a significant economic burden to global public health. Its pathophysiology is not completely elucidated yet, hence, the current therapies are restricted to treating the symptoms. Over the years, several epidemiological studies have shown disproportionalities in AD when sex is considered, which has encouraged researchers to investigate the potentiality of sex as a risk factor. Studies in rodent models have been used to investigate mechanistic basis of sex differences in AD, as well as the development of possible new sex-specific therapeutic strategies. However, full knowledge on factors related to this sexual dimorphism remains to be unraveled. Some findings point to differences in genetic and developmental backgrounds either earlier in life or in the aging brain. Herein we summarize the multisystemic framework behind the sex differences in AD and discuss the possible mechanisms involved in these differences raised by the literature so far in an integrative perspective. (AU)

FAPESP's process: 15/03354-3 - PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS AND NEUROPROTECTIVE INTERVENTIONS IN A PROGRESSIVE ANIMAL MODEL OF PARKINSON'S DISEASE
Grantee:Regina Helena da Silva
Support type: Regular Research Grants